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Posts Tagged ‘Management’

Obama’s Diversity, Sir Robinson’s Organic Learning and Loving Work


In the one of the most recent issues of The Economist, it is reported that Barack Obama needs to start changing his attitude towards corporate America. For the most part, he is obviously not openly against big business, but many of his former supporters, CEOs and Executives, are now telling The Economist, they are dissatisfied with the job the president has done so far.  The main concern is that the president does not understand each Executives particular trade because he has never been in the private sector. On top of that, there is not one person on his staff that resembles someone that would represent or understand the private, corporate sector. These issues could come to the forefront of the political scene as the economy and unemployment have been major issues. I have a feeling that over the next several years we will see significant focus on the getting the economy on track and just at the right time, as this will be one of the major issues that could get Mr. Obama re-elected.

For CEOs and Executives managing large corporations, some things to watch out for are recent tax cuts and incentives to R & D.  In addition, a couple of strategic hires to the Obama team from the corporate world could start to add fuel to the fire that the economy, unemployment and focus on the US corporate agenda might be gaining importance.  In addition, an executive with significant international experience might also help to leverage an increase in exports and a focus on particular industries suitable for manufacturing in the US (job creation).  An international leader from the corporate world would also allow some strategic partnerships across borders that might increase our allies and positive relationships, especially with China, Brazil, India and Mexico, where so much of the corporate cross hairs are focused.

Diversifying Obama’s administrative team is easier said than done, obviously, and his political moves are well calculated when adding to the human capital of his administrative team.  In the TED talk below, you can see as Sir Ken Robinson adds that to get a diverse array of human resources, you can significantly add to the human capital of your team.  By creating the conditions in which the human resources flourish, you can have a talented pool of diverse skills.  These skills cultivated by the fact that the passion someone has for a job is what they have been doing their whole lives, simply because they love it.  Sir Ken Robinson talks extensively about how we organically educate young people, not only in the US but everywhere in the world.  The fast food chain model of standardizing the education system only stifles the potential growth.  More autonomy with some structure can allow people to flourish and finding that balance is tantamount to positive employee engagement.

The NOW management system allows for the diversity in the workplace and the autonomy to expand and discover new, unique and efficient ways to solve problems.  The NOW management system provides the structure and the conditions for any employee to grow organically by learning and solving problems on their own.  This allows for an increase in employee engagement because everyone can see the success and achievement.  The transparency and accountability leads to a new culture where the employees in a corporate environment are not just getting through the week, but are actively engaged in solving problems to eliminate inefficiencies, so they can focus on the growth of the company.

http://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_bring_on_the_revolution.html

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Social Organization (#2 via John Moore’s Weblog)


This article was posted by John Moore a few days ago. It is an important article in the series on Social Ecosystem and all of us at Periscope are excited to see this conversation evolve. Take a look and let us know what you think. Join the discussion!

via John Moore’s weblog: As you may recall, in part one of defining the Social Organization we discussed a few reasons why we need a new view of the world.  We also took time to define The Social Organization in very simple terms:

The Social Organization will use standard approaches that make it easy for customers/citizens to find and buy products and services while enabling the organization to meet their goals.

This easy to understand definition enables us to begin to define the attributes of the Social Organization:

  • Social Organizations use standard approaches.  They follow a well-defined framework for successfully achieving their goals. We will define this framework as we go, but understand that 75-80% of the framework applies across all types of organizations in The Social Ecosystem.  The remaining percentage takes into account the uniqueness of your organization.
  • Social Organizations focus on delivering value in an equitable way.  We do not live in a utopian world, we live in a world where services are delivered in a way where, ideally, customers feel they have received value while allowing organizations to meet their goals (for businesses, making money).  For example:
    • When a customer buys an iPhone they are not focused on the amount of profit made by Apple, they are only concerned with the value received for their money.  If they feel they received the value expected they are happy.  If Apple, as the Social Organization in this example, is able to meet its goals as well, both sides have “won”, equity is achieved.

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The Social Ecosystem (via John Moore’s Weblog)


John  Moore’s recent article (The Social Ecosystem) is of great interest to all of us at The Periscope Group. Is a concept such as a “social ecosystem”  ready for prime time? In our opinion the answer is yes. Here’s an excerpt from John’s article:

“Organizations of all types have struggled to come to grips with terms like Government 2.0, Social Business, Social Media, and a long list of others that are floating around book stores, universities, and blogs.

I have spent a lot of time speaking with businesses and government agencies, exploring what is working, what is failing, and seeking to understand where confusion and hype are preventing these organizations from achieving full value from their efforts. The Social Ecosystem is the result of these efforts and is meant to reduce confusion and offer guidance for organizations across the world.

Lofty goals? Perhaps, but the Social Ecosystem is not being defined in a vacuum, it will fully leverage many ideas that are already available and will evolve, as needed, as we continue to learn more.

For this post I will discuss, at a high level, the major components of the Social Ecosystem as well as some key definitions. Over time I plan to create a table of contents, a section for terms, and break this down into a book-like format. Please be patient as it will take time and we’ll all work through this together.”  Read More

John, thank you for getting the conversation rolling. We very much like the “social ecosystem” concept and the 3 key components. Over the last 2 years we’ve talked to a lot of leaders in private and public sectors. To a person they have asked for clarification and some sort of threaded language to wrap their heads (and strategies and budgets) around. Trying to explain things in an unthreaded system was and continues to be very difficult. It steals cycles that need to be focused on development. A “social ecosystem” would have made a huge difference in achieving clarity of purpose, alignment of strategies and ultimately allocation of resources. We’re looking forward to the evolution of these conversations and the “social ecosystem.” We will bring several people who are building a “system of management” into this conversation as well. Ultimately, that system and this ecosystem will be closely tied together.

via The Social Ecosystem

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Is It A Winning Combination?!


Beware the shiny object. The appeal of the bright new toy is impossible to resist.

Managers have longed searched for that one thing they need to do that will engage their people, transforming the business and creating the ultimate sustainable competitive advantage. We’ve all read the endless stream of books and through them dreamed of a better way. Who hasn’t tried process improvement, scorecards, lean, six sigma, teamwork, personality styles testing, change management and, of course, the power of the new twist on leadership? Well executed, all of these ideas contribute to better performance. With the plethora of information available, our successes in the world of management and leadership should be clear. Right?

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Draw within the lines? .. Not in my Job Description!!


When you are the one responsible for bringing in the revenue for your company you’re always thinking outside of the box and trying to find new and efficient ways to exceed your goals!  Always thinking, Always exploring.  We do this in order to get the job done & Win!

Aaron Howard’s recent posting “DRAW WITHIN THE LINES OR ELSE” got me thinking.  Why in the world would an organization stifle the very creativity that might just be the key to growing revenue or saving costs? The answer may very well be that the CEO and or the management team have lost touch with the troupes on the line.   Or it might be that the employee is not creative enough.

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Giving Constructive Feedback


What is the most difficult part of giving constructive feedback?  Delivering it so that the recipient actually hears, understands and acts on the feedback.

There are three key techniques to enable someone to hear and act on your feedback:

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Do You Have Voices In Your Head?


Over the years, Henry Ford’s mass production system of management and its underlying logic has permeated organizational life from factories to banks to grocery stores and even our educational system. Today few of us realize that the underlying logic of the organizations we work in or run as leaders is in fact based on the model of management Ford invented over a century ago.

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A Waste Of Human Life


Life is a precious thing, and to waste it by working in a job that lacks purpose and meaning is about as disengaging as its gets. It is human nature to want to be part of something greater than ourselves. Most organizations fail to connect each employee with the purpose they serve in the bigger organization, and that failure results in disengagement. Yet, every employee is a part of some greater processes; through that process they create value essential to work that matters to the organization.

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