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Posts Tagged ‘Innovation’

Where do ideas come from? via Seth Godin


Here’s a great blog from Seth Godin. It’s all about ideas. What cool ideas are in your mind today?

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  1. Ideas don’t come from watching television
  2. Ideas sometimes come from listening to a lecture
  3. Ideas often come while reading a book
  4. Good ideas come from bad ideas, but only if there are enough of them
  5. Ideas hate conference rooms, particularly conference rooms where there is a history of criticism, personal attacks or boredom
  6. Ideas occur when dissimilar universes collide
  7. Ideas often strive to meet expectations. If people expect them to appear, they do
  8. Ideas fear experts, but they adore beginner’s mind. A little awareness is a good thing
  9. Ideas come in spurts, until you get frightened. Willie Nelson wrote three of his biggest hits in one week
  10. Ideas come from trouble
  11. Ideas come from our ego, and they do their best when they’re generous and selfless
  12. Ideas come from nature
  13. Sometimes ideas come from fear (usually in movies) but often they come from confidence
  14. Useful ideas come from being awake, alert enough to actually notice
  15. Though sometimes ideas sneak in when we’re asleep and too numb to be afraid
  16. Ideas come out of the corner of the eye, or in the shower, when we’re not trying
  17. Mediocre ideas enjoy copying what happens to be working right this minute
  18. Bigger ideas leapfrog the mediocre ones
  19. Ideas don’t need a passport, and often cross borders (of all kinds) with impunity
  20. An idea must come from somewhere, because if it merely stays where it is and doesn’t join us here, it’s hidden. And hidden ideas don’t ship, have no influence, no intersection with the market. They die, alone.
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Lego Matrix Trinity Help (Fun)


OK … it’s a holiday and time for a little fun. These guys must have a lot of time on their hands. In any case, it’s cool. Enjoy! Happy 4th too.

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Social Organization (#2 via John Moore’s Weblog)


This article was posted by John Moore a few days ago. It is an important article in the series on Social Ecosystem and all of us at Periscope are excited to see this conversation evolve. Take a look and let us know what you think. Join the discussion!

via John Moore’s weblog: As you may recall, in part one of defining the Social Organization we discussed a few reasons why we need a new view of the world.  We also took time to define The Social Organization in very simple terms:

The Social Organization will use standard approaches that make it easy for customers/citizens to find and buy products and services while enabling the organization to meet their goals.

This easy to understand definition enables us to begin to define the attributes of the Social Organization:

  • Social Organizations use standard approaches.  They follow a well-defined framework for successfully achieving their goals. We will define this framework as we go, but understand that 75-80% of the framework applies across all types of organizations in The Social Ecosystem.  The remaining percentage takes into account the uniqueness of your organization.
  • Social Organizations focus on delivering value in an equitable way.  We do not live in a utopian world, we live in a world where services are delivered in a way where, ideally, customers feel they have received value while allowing organizations to meet their goals (for businesses, making money).  For example:
    • When a customer buys an iPhone they are not focused on the amount of profit made by Apple, they are only concerned with the value received for their money.  If they feel they received the value expected they are happy.  If Apple, as the Social Organization in this example, is able to meet its goals as well, both sides have “won”, equity is achieved.

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The Social Ecosystem (via John Moore’s Weblog)


John  Moore’s recent article (The Social Ecosystem) is of great interest to all of us at The Periscope Group. Is a concept such as a “social ecosystem”  ready for prime time? In our opinion the answer is yes. Here’s an excerpt from John’s article:

“Organizations of all types have struggled to come to grips with terms like Government 2.0, Social Business, Social Media, and a long list of others that are floating around book stores, universities, and blogs.

I have spent a lot of time speaking with businesses and government agencies, exploring what is working, what is failing, and seeking to understand where confusion and hype are preventing these organizations from achieving full value from their efforts. The Social Ecosystem is the result of these efforts and is meant to reduce confusion and offer guidance for organizations across the world.

Lofty goals? Perhaps, but the Social Ecosystem is not being defined in a vacuum, it will fully leverage many ideas that are already available and will evolve, as needed, as we continue to learn more.

For this post I will discuss, at a high level, the major components of the Social Ecosystem as well as some key definitions. Over time I plan to create a table of contents, a section for terms, and break this down into a book-like format. Please be patient as it will take time and we’ll all work through this together.”  Read More

John, thank you for getting the conversation rolling. We very much like the “social ecosystem” concept and the 3 key components. Over the last 2 years we’ve talked to a lot of leaders in private and public sectors. To a person they have asked for clarification and some sort of threaded language to wrap their heads (and strategies and budgets) around. Trying to explain things in an unthreaded system was and continues to be very difficult. It steals cycles that need to be focused on development. A “social ecosystem” would have made a huge difference in achieving clarity of purpose, alignment of strategies and ultimately allocation of resources. We’re looking forward to the evolution of these conversations and the “social ecosystem.” We will bring several people who are building a “system of management” into this conversation as well. Ultimately, that system and this ecosystem will be closely tied together.

via The Social Ecosystem

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New Series: The Hero’s Journey


When Luke Skywalker first got serious about becoming a Jedi Knight he faced an early challenge. It was simple; he had to “trust the force.” Like the typical hero Luke’s reaction to Obi-Wan Kenobi’s challenge was bold (however naive) confidence. Internally he must have wondered what trusting the force meant, but his youthful and arrogant nature caused him to be bold about his ability to master the challenge before him.

Luke had nonetheless made a commitment to begin his journey to a new world—an alternate reality. And the commitment set the journey in motion. It would prove to be a classic Hero’s Journey, a journey of rich personal transformation.

In the every-day world when we commit to explore a new paradigm the journey begins with an acknowledgement of the possibility that another world exists—or another way to see the world—and our decision to pursue it. And it is really underway when we decide we are willing to do whatever it takes to get to the other side.

While we have learned to function within ths seriese world we know so well, as leaders we sometimes get called to venture into a new world and it is the hero within that gives us the courage to begin the exploration. But the decision to explore a new world is filled with many frightening questions.

The next article in this series will explore some of these questions. BTW, your thoughts on this journey would be great to hear.

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Such Little Thinking! Such Great Things!


Our natural creative energies as human beings thrive in the world of the incremental. We love making little improvements and our minds are always working on something—something we can do to make our lives a little bit better. We love ideas so much that people with BIG ideas become our heroes. We love invention and we love the people who invent. What would our lives be like without automobiles, canned food, pasteurized milk, beer, refrigerators, zippers, CAT scanners, television, air conditioning, computers, the microwave oven, the dishwasher, the lawnmower, the stapler, Post-It Note, GPS and don’t forget the bar-code! Every one of those had to be invented by someone, and every one of those inventions depended on hundreds if not thousands of previous inventions in order to be possible. Invention is dependent upon a succession of incremental ideas that build and combine into things that transform our world; big inventions are usually only made possible through many, many little inventions. What have you invented lately?

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100 Ideas Per Employee Per Year? Impossible!


The vast majority of businesses manage to put to use an incredibly small fraction of the ideas generated by people who work in the business. For most businesses, the number of ideas implemented per employee is terribly low, less than 10 a year, and for many the number is closer to zero. So much for tapping into the natural creativity of the workforce.

Why does this happen? Why would we pass this opportunity up? Why would we let those hundreds of good ideas die on the vine?

Why would we not want to grow our revenue, lower our costs and thrill our customers?

Why would we not selfishly grab every idea that would make our business more successful?

Why would we not want our people to feel respected and creative and successful?

The answer is simple. We do want all those things. But, we cannot see how it is possible to dramatically increase the implementation of ideas – certainly not the level where in excess of 100 ideas are implemented per employee per year.

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Visual Learning, Part Seven: ROI


When investing time and money in the development of visual business solutions, returns are achieved in three primary categories: cultural, operational and financial. Cultural benefits include increased commitment and accountability. Operational benefits include increased productivity, reduced cycle time, increased efficiency, reduced waste, and improved quality. Financial benefits include reduced operating costs, reduction in FTEs, increased profit margins and improved use of assets.

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Visual Learning, Part Six: Process Mapping


Processes are a series of steps or actions that transform inputs into well-defined outcomes or outputs. Well-managed organizations understand that everything they do is a series of integrated processes: purchasing, building, product development, technical support, customer service, hiring, accounting, finance, etc. These organizations also know that their processes and related impacts extend beyond the walls of the organization to include suppliers, partners and customers.

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Visual Learning, Part Five: Strategy Map


According to research by Harvard Business School, 90% of business strategies are not successfully implemented. One reason is that leaders and employees do not have clear and actionable strategies or an implementation plan. Therefore, employees’ daily decisions and actions do not focus on implementing the strategy. A second reason is that organizations do not capture and visually display metrics in a way that cements accountability.

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