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Posts Tagged ‘Ideas’

Where do ideas come from? via Seth Godin


Here’s a great blog from Seth Godin. It’s all about ideas. What cool ideas are in your mind today?

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  1. Ideas don’t come from watching television
  2. Ideas sometimes come from listening to a lecture
  3. Ideas often come while reading a book
  4. Good ideas come from bad ideas, but only if there are enough of them
  5. Ideas hate conference rooms, particularly conference rooms where there is a history of criticism, personal attacks or boredom
  6. Ideas occur when dissimilar universes collide
  7. Ideas often strive to meet expectations. If people expect them to appear, they do
  8. Ideas fear experts, but they adore beginner’s mind. A little awareness is a good thing
  9. Ideas come in spurts, until you get frightened. Willie Nelson wrote three of his biggest hits in one week
  10. Ideas come from trouble
  11. Ideas come from our ego, and they do their best when they’re generous and selfless
  12. Ideas come from nature
  13. Sometimes ideas come from fear (usually in movies) but often they come from confidence
  14. Useful ideas come from being awake, alert enough to actually notice
  15. Though sometimes ideas sneak in when we’re asleep and too numb to be afraid
  16. Ideas come out of the corner of the eye, or in the shower, when we’re not trying
  17. Mediocre ideas enjoy copying what happens to be working right this minute
  18. Bigger ideas leapfrog the mediocre ones
  19. Ideas don’t need a passport, and often cross borders (of all kinds) with impunity
  20. An idea must come from somewhere, because if it merely stays where it is and doesn’t join us here, it’s hidden. And hidden ideas don’t ship, have no influence, no intersection with the market. They die, alone.
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100 Ideas Per Employee Per Year? Impossible!


The vast majority of businesses manage to put to use an incredibly small fraction of the ideas generated by people who work in the business. For most businesses, the number of ideas implemented per employee is terribly low, less than 10 a year, and for many the number is closer to zero. So much for tapping into the natural creativity of the workforce.

Why does this happen? Why would we pass this opportunity up? Why would we let those hundreds of good ideas die on the vine?

Why would we not want to grow our revenue, lower our costs and thrill our customers?

Why would we not selfishly grab every idea that would make our business more successful?

Why would we not want our people to feel respected and creative and successful?

The answer is simple. We do want all those things. But, we cannot see how it is possible to dramatically increase the implementation of ideas – certainly not the level where in excess of 100 ideas are implemented per employee per year.

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Where Ideas Go To Die


The collision between a less-than-half-baked idea and a busy boss creates a guaranteed deadend.  After a few of those collisions and it’s not hard to understand why employees disengage. Why bother when your boss is your latest brilliant ideas as a bother.

That said, ideas are the lifeblood of improvement. Companies that will survive and prosper understand that the responsibility to fix problems and improve processes must belong to the people who do the work. Everyone needs the skill to solve process problems.

Effective companies use a common approach to problem solving (such as a 7-Step Method), an approach everyone in the organization understands well. The method not only develops the skills to think through ideas, but it also transfers the skills, knowledge and authority to see the solution through to success.

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Your Employees Have Bad Ideas


Experienced managers show doubt in their faces when they hear it said that employees have good ideas. Often, the suggestions for improvement workers offer their bosses are not well reasoned or fully developed—and some are just plain stupid.  Employees are just not that smart.

Read the rest of this entry »

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